God wants what is best for His children.

perseverance

Are you a Christian?  Have you confessed your sins and repented of them, and asked God’s forgiveness by the power of the blood of Jesus Christ?  If you have been saved, then you can rest confidently that God wants what is best for you.  God wants what is best for you even more than you want what is best for you.  The thing that we must learn – sometimes painfully – is that often times we do not know what is best for us.  Thankfully, God does.

Scripture teaches us the primary desire of God for our lives, His will for our lives:

“For this is the will of God, your sanctification…”

– 1 Thess 4.3

Sanctification is a big, theological and heady word which is not typically on the forefront of our minds when we consider our life choices and decision making.  Sanctification is the ongoing process of salvation by which we are being made more like Jesus and less like the world.  It is getting to know God more fully, and in response putting to death the deeds of the flesh.  It is becoming Heaven-minded and not worldly minded.  It is our Spiritual maturation process.  So, in short, it is God’s will that we mature and grow Spiritually.  Paul explains what sanctification looks like for the Church at Thessalonica and for us, at least in part:

“For this is the will of God, your sanctification; that is, that you abstain from sexual immorality; that each of you know how to possess his own vessel in sanctification and honor, not in lustful passion, like the Gentiles who do not know God; and that no man transgress and defraud his brother in the matter because the Lord is the avenger in all these things, just as we also told you before and solemnly warned you.  For God has not called us for the purpose of impurity, but in sanctification.”

– 1 Thess 4.3-7

The Thessalonians needed instruction and discipline in their sexuality and relationship with one another.  Throughout Scripture we see more exhaustive lists of the sins and deeds that God hates, i.e. Gal 5.19-20.  But Paul summarizes His teaching simply, “God has not called us for the purpose of impurity, but in sanctification”.  This is God’s will for us.  And if we have begun the walk of the Christian life, if we have recognized and begun to confess our sins, then we also should be growing in our hatred for and conviction of sin and desiring to become more like Christ.  Our will should also be our sanctification.

That is the best for us.

We also can claim the promise of Scripture that if we have begun that walk with the Lord, He will complete it in us:

“For I am confident of this very thing, that He who began a good work in you will perfect it until the day of Christ Jesus.”

– Phil 1.6

When we come to God for salvation through Jesus Christ, the Holy Spirit takes up residence within our lives and begins the process of Sanctification from within.  We then get to practice dying to the flesh and letting Him live through us.  He is at work within us, and He will complete the work of sanctification.

“…for it is God who is at work in you, both to will and to work for His good pleasure.”

– Phil 2.13

So if we know that Scripture teaches us clearly that God’s will is for our sanctification, for us to become more like Jesus, and that He promises to complete that work in our lives, we can know fully that all things will work out for our best:

“And we know that God causes all things to work together for good to those who love God, to those who are called according to His purpose.”

– Rom 8.28

Our best, however, is rarely what we desire in our hearts.  Consider the things you long for, work for, and pray for.  Do you desire a nice house?  A new car?  Nice clothes?  Fancy food?  Do you desire to have a consistent life that is not interrupted?  A schedule that makes sense and allows for the right amount of sleep, exercise and socializing?  Do you pray for good health?  For people around you to live forever?  For your children to be perfectly behaved?  Do you pray for those things that are making you uncomfortable to be taken away?

These things are not bad in and of themselves.  Jesus, in fact, promises rest and peace to those who come to Him (Matt 11.28-29).  He desires to give us peace and rest.  But have you ever reflected on a season of peace and rest and said, “I grew so much during that time”, or “My faith is at a place it has never been before”.  No, you have not.  And do you know why?  Because God knows that our faith only grows and is refined through testing – through the fire.

“Consider it all joy, my brethren, when you encounter various trials, knowing that the testing of your faith produces endurance.  And let endurance have its perfect result, so that you may be perfect and complete, lacking in nothing.”

– James 1.2-4

“Therefore, having been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom also we have obtained our introduction by faith into this grace in which we stand; and we exult in hope of the glory of God.  And not only this, but we also exult in our tribulations, knowing that tribulation brings about perseverance; and perseverance, proven character; and proven character, hope; and hope does not disappoint, because the love of God has been poured out within our hearts through the Holy Spirit who was given to us.”

– Rom 5.1-5

We grow in sanctification, we mature, and we develop perseverance, character and hope through suffering and trials.  It is after a season of tremendous difficulty and suffering that believers look back and are amazed at the faithfulness of God and the development of their faith.  Faith is not developed by comfortable lives, it is developed by relying on God through the storm.

Think about it this way:  If sanctification is becoming more like Jesus, should we not expect to live the kind of life that Jesus did?  Jesus had no house, no earthly possessions and treasures.  He lived a life fully devoted to God, and He suffered hatred, persecution and death on a cross because of it.  Jesus Himself said,

“Remember the word that I said to you, ‘A slave is not greater than his master.’ If they persecuted Me, they will also persecute you; if they kept My word, they will keep yours also.”

– John 15.20

Non believers hated and persecuted Jesus.  If we are becoming more like Jesus, non believers will hate and persecute us as well.  We also know that Jesus, in His greatest hour of suffering, asked God to take away the suffering, but God did not:

“Father, if You are willing, remove this cup from Me; yet not My will, but Yours be done.”

– Luke 22.42

Have you ever been in the midst of suffering and begged God to take it from you?  And He chose not to?  What was the result?  Did you ultimately grow and mature in your faith?  Or did you become embittered and resent God for the trial?  If you are a servant of Jesus, you can expect great suffering.  And you can expect that God will bring about your sanctification – your best – through it.

For four years I lived a life that many thought was one that required great faith.  I loved the opportunity to serve, and relished every moment of it.  It was indeed a life the required much sacrifice and conviction, but because of the desires God had placed in my heart it required minimal faith in the sense of perseverance through trial and testing.  Then God rocked my world and completely changed my life’s trajectory.  I then was forced to live a life that few would consider a life that requires much faith, but for me – because of those convictions and desires I have – it requires a daily submission and new step of faith.  And I can honestly look back on the last three years and see immensely more faith, trust and hope developed than in the four years before.

God is testing my faith.  And I am thankful that I can see growth through it.  I am also thankful that I know it means He is working in me, for my best, and for my sanctification.

We naturally want what is easiest and what feels the best.  But God has promised to develop faith and Spiritual maturity in His children.  And the way He does that is by testing and refining our faith through the fire of tribulation and suffering.  He wants what is best for you more than you want it for yourself, and He knows what is best for you – much more clearly than you know.  Are you in a season of peace and comfort right now?  Or is your faith being refined?  Can you look back over your life and see those seasons of testing and purification?  Or have you lived a relatively comfortable life that required little faith?  Trust God.  Know that He tested Jesus and even asked Jesus to surrender His desires and will.  Know that we, as Jesus’ servants, are not greater than our master and that we will be hated, persecuted, and tested by God.  And if you have not, then I would go back to the foundation and see if you have surrendered your life to God and asked for salvation.

He will work the best out for you.  And it will be through discipline and testing.  Trust Him through it, and you will be amazed at how you grow.

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God is getting ready to do something big.

change the world

When I was a sophomore in High School, I went on a mission trip with a bunch of other high schoolers from around the country to South Korea.  There were around thirty of us, plus adult chaperones and leaders.  We spent a week together getting ready, learning music, praying, and preparing ourselves to go and then we spent a month traveling around military posts and camps sharing about Jesus.  While we were having our week-long preparation, an emergency arose with the team leader and he had to withdraw from the trip.  The mission organization brought in another team leader who was able to lead us, but there were a variety of other hiccups along the way that made this particular trip substantially more difficult than others – others which had more than double the number of participants.  As we were loading the bus to go to the airport to begin our trip, we had one final prayer meeting and the sentiment was shared over us, “God is going to do something big through this group – because the enemy has worked hard to make this trip not happen”.

Nothing big happened – at least in our observation.

Yes, God is infinitely bigger than us and has every circumstance orchestrated sovereignly to accomplish His perfect will in and through us, and there could be ripple effects from that trip to South Korea of which I and the rest of the team will never be aware.  But in our finite perspective, we did what we said we were going to do, we saw a very limited response, and we came home.

Many times when we are walking through crises and difficulties in life, we comfort ourselves with the platitude that “God is getting ready to do something big”.  The only explanation we can muster to understand our suffering is how awesome we are, God wants to change the world through us, and therefore Satan is putting up a big fight to slow us down or thwart the plan.

But may I ask you, how many times have you come through that difficulty and observed a mighty act of God?

And how many times do you get through the difficulty and immediately forget the suffering, and stop looking to God?

Scripture teaches us that Satan does in fact prowl around on the Earth like a roaring lion, seeking those whom he can devour.

“Be of sober spirit, be on the alert. Your adversary, the devil, prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour.”

– 1 Peter 5.8

Satan is looking for people who are weak, who are distracted, who are able to be devoured and made ineffective for the name of Christ.  He also uses his cunning to attack the diligent – as he twisted Scripture and attempted to deceive Jesus Himself!  But no where does Scripture teach us that Satan sees the plan of God and therefore sets out to thwart it by throwing obstacles in our path.

Rather we see from Scripture that trials and tribulations are actually a part of God’s perfect plan for our sanctification and maturity:

“Consider it all joy, my brethren, when you encounter various trials, knowing that the testing of your faith produces endurance.  And let endurance have its perfect result, so that you may be perfect and complete, lacking in nothing.”

– James 1.2-4

“And not only this, but we also exult in our tribulations, knowing that tribulation brings about perseverance; and perseverance, proven character; and proven character, hope; and hope does not disappoint, because the love of God has been poured out within our hearts through the Holy Spirit who was given to us.”

– Rom 5.3-5

The testing of our faith produces endurance – when we persevere through trials.  And endurance results in character, hope, and ultimately maturity.  In short, we will not become mature believers until we walk through trials and difficult times, and grow from them.  Our faith must be tested and refined in order for it to become more pure.  If left stagnant and untested, it will remain immature.

So I guess we need to reconsider what exactly it is that we mean when we say God is going to do something big.  Do we mean that God is going to help us grow, understand the Gospel, and become more mature and Christlike?  If so, then let’s continue to praise God’s sovereignty in our circumstances.  But let us beware of giving Satan too much credit.  Scripture is full of unfathomably difficult circumstances.  Abraham was asked to sacrifice his only son – who was born to him when he was 100 years old, after leaving his country and roaming for most of his life.  Joseph spent years in slavery and in prison while waiting for God to fulfill the vision He gave of him being in a position of high leadership.  David was anointed king and then literally ran and hid for his life for years while waiting for God to put him in power.  Jesus Himself lived a lifetime on earth without a house or place to lay His head, and then suffered death in the form of crucifixion.

Now, we know that God was doing the mightiest of works through Jesus’ life, death and resurrection.  But even Jesus was disciplined and learned maturity through trials.  He was glorified as the son of God by His perfect example of perseverance through even the most unfathomable of situations:

“In the days of His flesh, [Jesus] offered up both prayers and supplications with loud crying and tears to the One able to save Him from death, and He was heard because of His piety.  Although He was a Son, He learned obedience from the things which He suffered. And having been made [mature], He became to all those who obey Him the source of eternal salvation…”

– Heb 5.7-9

So let us step back and take a realistic look at our lives.  When we encounter a trial and difficult situation, let us keep in perspective the fact that God not only allows but orchestrates the testing of our faith so that we can grow, become more mature, and be more like Christ.  Without the testing of our faith, we do not grow.  So let us take comfort in the fact that yes, God is doing something – but the magnitude of it may only be a refinement of sin within our own hearts.  God is not necessarily planning on changing the world just because this went wrong or that fell through.

But let us also be intentional to step back and see the lessons and refinement that is intended by our circumstances.  If God has you in a trial, it is for your growth and sanctification.  We will not grow if we do not join Him in perseverance and faith through it.  If we just hunker down and wait for the situation to end, if we just barrel through and force the resolution that we want, if we do not intentionally seek out God and His plan through our suffering, then when we get to the other side we will have not persevered in faith; we just got through it.  And we forget.  As soon as it is over, we no longer placate ourselves with the empty hope that God is getting ready to do something because we are comfortable again and God gets placed right back on the back burner where He belongs.

Rather, let us get in God’s face and ask Him boldly, “What is it that you want me to learn here?”.  Let us press into God during these trials and experience the refinement that He intends for us.  And then, when it is over, let us be able to look back and see what exactly God did in our hearts and in our lives during those trials.  Let us intentionally engage with God, be humble, grow, see what He is doing, and at the end be able to give witness to it.  God is doing something big, and that is our sanctification.

All things work together for good for those who love God – and often the good is our Spiritual growth and maturity.

“And we know that God causes all things to work together for good to those who love God, to those who are called according to His purpose.”

– Rom 8.28

You know what assuming does…

assume

We all assume things in our daily lives.  We have an estimate of how long our commute to work will take, we figure that work requirements have remained the same as we go about our daily tasks, we make plans on what and where to eat based on our previous experiences with restaurants or recipes.  We understand scientific laws and expect that gravity will continue to hold us on the ground and that life will make general sense within our given set of variables.  But we have been taught to joke as a culture about the danger of assuming things that are on the fringe of reasonable expectation when it comes to people, because people will not always do what we expect them to do.

Have you ever stopped to consider that God will not always do what we expect Him to do?  And just because He told us to do one thing one time, He may ask us to do it differently next time?  My pastor showed a survey a few weeks ago asking the question, “Which generation turns to the Bible for direction in making decisions?”  The survey shocked everyone when it showed Millennials as the most likely to pull out the Bible looking for answers.  But as I reflected on the fact that the Baby Boomers and older were not very likely to pull out their Bibles, I had to wonder if it was in part because many of them have read the Bible so much that they think they already know the answers?

I have done no research and cannot offer that as a tested reason, but when I consider my own approach to Spirituality, I recognize that there are two types of questions that we ask God:  First, we ask God’s opinion on a matter.  God’s character, morality and promises never change.  They are established, they are set, and they are clearly outlined in Scripture for us to know.

“For I, the LORD, do not change…”

– Mal 3.6a

Every good thing given and every perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of lights, with whom there is no variation or shifting shadow.

– James 1.17

Is murder wrong?  You can clearly look up the ten commandments in Exodus 20 and read “You shall not murder”.  You can also read Jesus’ teaching in the Sermon on the Mount in Matt 5-7 and see that Jesus makes the teaching more intense by saying that being angry with someone makes one guilty before God, just as murder (Matt 5.21-22).  This does not change.

Secondly, we ask God for His direction.  In the Bible God has not given us a road map, turn-by-turn, for the life decisions that we are to make.  He intends for us to “abide” in Christ and receive direction for those life decisions by intimacy with Him and seeking His plan and His will.

When the Philistines heard that David had been anointed king over all Israel, all the Philistines went up in search of David; and David heard of it and went out against them.  Now the Philistines had come and made a raid in the valley of Rephaim.  David inquired of God, saying, “Shall I go up against the Philistines? And will You give them into my hand?” Then the LORD said to him, “Go up, for I will give them into your hand.”  So they came up to Baal-perazim, and David defeated them there; and David said, “God has broken through my enemies by my hand, like the breakthrough of waters.” Therefore they named that place Baal-perazim.  They abandoned their gods there; so David gave the order and they were burned with fire.  The Philistines made yet another raid in the valley.  David inquired again of God, and God said to him, “You shall not go up after them; circle around behind them and come at them in front of the balsam trees.  It shall be when you hear the sound of marching in the tops of the balsam trees, then you shall go out to battle, for God will have gone out before you to strike the army of the Philistines.”  David did just as God had commanded him, and they struck down the army of the Philistines from Gibeon even as far as Gezer.  Then the fame of David went out into all the lands; and the LORD brought the fear of him on all the nations.

– 1 Chro 14.8-17

When David became king, he had the promises of Samuel in his heart and mind that God was going to use him mightily and prosper him as king.  The Philistines set out to fight against David and David, even with those promises, turned immediately to God asking for instruction.  “Shall I go up against the Philistines?”  God not only said yes, but gave him battle plans.  Shortly thereafter, the situation repeated itself.  Would you be tempted to just jump in and do the same thing you had done before?  If you had just been through a battle, against the very same people, in the very same spot, would you expect God to bring victory just as he had done before?  I think I would.  But David was wise and chose to ask God for direction and God instructed David with a different battle plan.  The ultimate outcome was the same, but the method was different.

We cannot presume upon God.  He has promised us big picture things:  We will have ultimate victory in the end.  People from every tribe, tongue and nation will hear and believe the Gospel.  Nothing can separate us from His love or cause us to be lost.  But we still need to turn to Him for the battle plan.  Why?  Because God’s primary concern is our sanctification, and our sanctification is achieved through remaining in Him and relying on Him for daily support, instruction, and sustenance.

“For this is the will of God, your sanctification…”

– 1 Thess 4.3a

“Abide in Me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself unless it abides in the vine, so neither can you unless you abide in Me.  I am the vine, you are the branches; he who abides in Me and I in him, he bears much fruit, for apart from Me you can do nothing.  If anyone does not abide in Me, he is thrown away as a branch and dries up; and they gather them, and cast them into the fire and they are burned.  If you abide in Me, and My words abide in you, ask whatever you wish, and it will be done for you.”

– John 15.4-7

God rarely does the same thing twice.  Just because a certain ministry works in one church, it does not mean that God intends to use it in your church.  Just because you shared the Gospel a certain way one time and someone came to faith, it does not mean that God wants everyone to hear the Gospel the same way.  Just because God miraculously gave you a job through a random move one time, it does not mean that God wants you to move again.  These are morally neutral issues about which we must seek God’s will.  If we attempt to do these things on our own, we will fail or have moderate, fleshly success.  If we seek God in prayer and submission, He will guide us into His perfect path.

God’s primary concern is His glory and our satisfaction through resting in and knowing Him.  He does not need us, He is not served by us, and He will accomplish His plan with or without us.  But it is our blessing and honor to be included in the accomplishment of His will of bringing people to faith from every tribe around the world.  And if we want to be involved, or better yet, if we want to learn and see what God’s will is for our life, we must stop and ask Him.  Just because He led us one direction before does not mean that He will lead us the same way again.  Let us not presume upon God, but let us stop and ask Him what we He wants for us to do, even if we have been in a similar position before!